Author Archives: anaincolorado

About anaincolorado

Hi, I am an avid gardener both at home and at Rosedale Community Garden where I've had a plot for 19 years. I am very interested in learning more about gardening, how to preserve it, incorporating farm fresh produce into my cooking and living a healthy lifestyle. In addition, I am a Master Community Gardener through Denver Urban Gardens and am a shareholder at the Chatfield CSA. In 2015, I spearheaded an effort to start a community donation garden at St. Philip's Lutheran Church -- a project I will share on my blog. I am eager to share what I've learned and the adventures I had learning new things and interacting with the garden community.

2017 Harvest Sale at Rosedale Community Garden, Denver, CO — September 23, 2017

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2017 Harvest Sale at Rosedale Community Garden, Denver, CO — September 23, 2017

The Rosedale Community Garden Harvest Sale is on Saturday, September 23, 2017 from 9 am to 1 pm.   Featured at the sale will be organic vegetables, heirloom garlic and herbs grown in the community garden.   Fresh cut flowers, homemade jams and jellies, bakery, roasted kale chips and gently used garden books and supplies will also be for sale.

Rosedale Community Garden is one of the largest and oldest community gardens in Denver with over 100 plots.   It is located on Logan Street just south of Iliff Street and across from Harvard Gulch Recreation Center.

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Late Summer Produce and Planting in The Donation Garden — August 6

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Late Summer Produce and Planting in The Donation Garden — August 6

 

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In 2015, I helped start a donation garden at our family church in Littleton, CO and three summers later, the garden is still growing strong.   We donated over 400 pounds of organic vegetables in years one and two and hope to again this year.  The primary benefactor of the produce we grow is Sheridan Food Pantry.  Each Wednesday, we harvest, weigh and record the harvest before volunteers pick it up for delivery to the food pantry.

20664554_10212084087290872_4994398325057015282_nWith eight raised beds, several community plots and 30 X 30 square feet of plot space to plant, the garden is fairly large.  This year, my key partner in the project moved on to another area of ministry so I’ve been managing this project  practically on my own.  But despite her loss, I remain committed to the project and am excited for another banner year of harvests.   Stepping Stones, a center for adults with special needs has reached out to volunteer in the garden — and their help has been great.    My husband, boys and several friends have also chipped in to water and plant.  Next season, I hope to recruit more volunteers and increase the engagement of the church community as a whole.

20638649_10212084080730708_7954302197931968392_nAs with many gardens, some of the seeds planted did not come up and now that the spring crops have been harvested, there is abundant space for fall crops.   This week, I worked to prep the available space and devoted several hours to planting carrots, beets, cabbage, broccoli, beans, peas, and more.    The summer crops are producing well now and I’ve been harvesting summer squash, zucchini, squash, peppers, cucumbers, herbs and more.  Green tomatoes are growing on the vine, little green pumpkins are hiding beneath large leaves, miniature beans are appearing and the beets and carrots are almost ready to pick.

When the seeds come up weeks after planting in the smooth turned soil, it always seems miraculous to me.   Its always a joy when a thicket of green leafy vegetables emerges.   The hard work has paid off and our garden is thriving!

 

 

Garden Envy

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Garden Envy

In my travels, I visit gardens of all shapes and sizes and take tons of photos.  Always excited to visit my friends’ gardens, attend garden tours and visit local botanical gardens,  I just love to pick up new ideas and think about how I might apply new designs or planting combinations in my own gardens.   I am often as envious as I am inspired.  Here is a collection of some of the gardening ideas I admire:

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Teri’s tomatoes were protected from early season hail under the hoops. They are so tall and healthy.

 

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Dale’s potted tomatoes and trellised vegetables. Its a marvel what he accomplishes in a side yard.

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My neighbors at Rosedale in 2014, Diane and Johanna Montague, had such a perfectly orderly spring garden. Beautiful!

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Christine’s garden was already chock full of produce in late May – garlic, kale, berries, onions, greens, herbs. I loved how she used every square inch and had seedlings growing in egg cartons ready for hot season crops. Easthampton, MA

 

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At Nate and Ashley’s 2013 wedding in New Richmond, WI, the reception was held at a local farm. The little garden next to the house was surrounded by flowers and very organic in it design.

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My friend Mary’s squashes were trellised on these cool wooden structures. Hartland, WI. July 2017

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Centennial Gardens, University of Wisconsin, Madison. I love the order of this planter although I am realistic enough to know that my plants won’t conform to such order.

 

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I love the idea of a garden right outside the front door. The log Adirondack chairs, prayer flags and hollyhocks in the background all create a lovely vignette. Steamboat Springs Garden Tour, 2013.

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Spring Garden with lots of space to grow up. Spinach in the foreground with tomatoes in wall of water. Ute Trails Garden, May 2017

 

The Quest for the Perfect Tomato: The Maglia Rose

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The Quest for the Perfect Tomato:  The Maglia Rose

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Many passionate gardeners, including myself, propagate a variety of seedlings in early spring and after weeks or months of careful pampering and re-potting,  we often find ourselves with extra to share.  It was my good fortune that my garden pal Suzanne had extra tomato plants and offered me some  — four coffee cups containing three or more leggy 3 ft tall tomato plants which she called “Ana’s Tomatoes”.   When I asked her why, she said that they had come from a tomato I had given her last fall.   Of course, I remembered the exchange but also had forgotten the name of the tomato.

IMG_9750I recalled the box of sweet golf ball sized red and green streaked cherry tomatoes Katherine had brought to the seed exchange last fall.   I messaged her and Katherine reminded me that the tomatoes were called “Maglia Rose” after the mottled pink jersey worn by the lead racer in the Tour d’Italia.   Her husband had read about this variety in a newspaper article discussing research and rankings of heirloom tomatoes.   Ranked number one on the list, the Maglia Rose were considered easy to grow, prolific and resistant to disease.   Phil ordered seeds and has successfully grown the Magia Rose for several years.

“The Quest for the Perfect Tomato”, Washington Post, 9/15/17.

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Katherine and Phil’s crop of Maglia Rose tomatoes are very tall and hardy by late July.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/the-perfect-tomato-is-just-around-the-corner/2015/09/15/70909c22-57d4-11e5-b8c9-944725fcd3b9_story.html?

I transplanted the gifted tomato plants into earth boxes in my home garden and directly into the soil at my Rosedale Community Garden.   They were a little gangly so I propped them up with some red sumac branches from my winter pots.  So far, the plants are  thriving and full of little green tomatoes.   I see a large  harvest of Maglia Rose tomatoes in my future.

Description of the Maglia Rose:

  • Short, semi-determinate vines are good for pots and containers
  • Ready about 55 days after transplanting
  • The vines can be left to sprawl and do not need to be stakes.
  • Fruits prolifically
  • Pick tomatoes while they are light pink, which is the stage when peak flavor occurs

 

Planning My Fall Garden

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Planning My Fall Garden

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After years of planting a vegetable garden, I finally learned that one can plant continuously throughout the season.   By mid-July, garlic, peas, and spring crops have been harvested leaving room in my garden.    Planting more seeds will keep the weeds at bay and provide more crops for an autumn harvest.   Cooler autumn days are a mere month away,  so its time to gather seeds and make a plan to get those crops in while the days are longer and the temps are warm.   This method of following a harvested crop with another is known as succession and/or seasonal planting.

The following is a list of some of the crops I’ve successfully planted in late July/early August:

  • Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mesclun, Pak Choy, Spinach, Swiss Chard, Peas
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Crops planted in late July are taking off by late August — beans, cabbage, beets, kale.

 

There are more options including curly parsley, claytonia, turnips, mizuna, radish, endive, leeks and mache.   For a successful late fall harvest, you need to time your cold-season crops properly.   They should be planted when the weather is still warm — in late summer or early autumn — and while there is still more than 10 hours of sunlight per day.     Cold-season crops should be almost mature by the time the cold weather finally arrives in late autumn.   Protecting the vegetables with a season extender like a cold frame or hoop tunnel will enable them to hold on through the winter.

 

 

 

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Getting the cold frame ready for late summer planting of cold crops.

Here are some examples of fall crops planted from locally purchased seeds:

Scarlet Nantes Carrot

  • Days to germination:  12-18 days
  • Days to maturity:  65-75
  • Plant dates:   August 1-31
  • Harvest date:  October 10-November 15

Early Vienna White Kohlrabi

  • Days to germination:  6-12 days
  • Days to maturity:  58 days
  • Plant dates:  August 10-September 10
  • Harvest date:  October 15-November 15

Chinese Cabbage – Pak Choi

  • Days to germination:  5-7 days
  • Days to maturity:  50 days
  • Plant dates:  August 10-September 10
  • Harvest dates:  October 5-November 5

Red Acre Cabbage

  • Days to germination:  7-12 days
  • Days to maturity:  65 days
  • Plant dates:  August 1-5
  • Harvest dates:   October 6-15

Ruby Queen Beets

  • Days to germination:  10-14 days
  • Days to maturity:  55 days
  • Plant dates:   August 1-15
  • Harvest dates:  October 5-15

When its time to start,  I gather my supplies, clean up the planting area and add compost if needed.   I set aside a day in late July/early August to plant seeds.  If I have time, I’ll do a second planting a week or two later.   I make sure to map out my crops on paper and mark the rows well so I can see what’s coming up.

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My friend Jen helped me plant carrots, beets, lettuce, kohlrabi, cabbage and more.. August 4, 2017.

This last round of crops is awesome but can be a challenge to process with the avalanche of tomatoes, peppers and other warm season crops that pile up just after the first frost — late September to late October in Denver.   Make sure to set aside time for cooking and preserving in September and October.  I often invite friends over to preserve together to make it more fun.  The investment in time will be worth it.   The planting is easy and  you grow more than you can eat or preserve, share the surplus with friends or donate to the local food bank.

I challenge you to plant a fall garden and you’ll be happy with the results!

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The broccoli in the raised bed survived the frost and we harvested into November.

 

 

 

A Tour and a Taste at Tabal Chocolate

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A Tour and a Taste at Tabal Chocolate

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During my recent visit home to Wisconsin, I had the opportunity to visit Tabal Chocolate, a business owned by my high school friend, Dan Bieser.  For nearly five years, I’ve followed Dan’s journey of sourcing cacao beans from Bolivia, the Dominican Republic, Peru and Nicaragua for use in making his own custom chocolate all the way to the opening his first shop in our hometown of Wauwatosa earlier this year.   All through the miracle of our Facebook friendship!   He told me that when searching for a name for his business, he discovered the Mayan word “tabal” meaning relationship.  He thought it perfectly expressed what he was trying to do with his business.  Eager to check out the new store, I googled the shop and called to see if I could sign up for one of the classes.   Making Truffles was top of the list!  As it turned out, the classes were full but Dan offered to give me a private tour!

The moment I walked in the door of Tabal Chocolate, my senses where overwhelmed by the aroma of rich chocolate.   Closing my eyes, I took a deep breath and remembered the days of my youth when we were treated to the same rich aroma driving past the Ambrosia Chocolate Factory in downtown Milwaukee.   If one could taste chocolate from merely inhaling it, Tabal Chocolate is the place.   Located in the charmingly intimate and walkable village of Wauwatosa Wisconsin, this new shop is a great place to buy locally made chocolate bars, chocolate nibs — the new superfood, gelato, cocoa shell mulch for the garden and delicious desserts created with chocolate made on the premises.

Dan greeted me at the door and introduced me to several of his friendly employees.   I was impressed with the warm inviting decor of the shop.   The space was framed by a marble counter displaying a selection of gelato, pocket candies, warm chocolate churning in a circular dispenser, wooden shelves displaying a variety of chocolate bars, bags of nibs, samples, and comfortable tables both inside and out.   The aromatic space was complemented by the warm employees and awash in sunlight from two floor to ceiling windows looking out on Harwood Avenue.    I was particularly interested in the operation going on behind the glass window at the back of the store.   Dan invited me into this production room, showed me how the cacao beans were ground and spooned out a sample of chocolate from each machine.   Sweet!

We then headed down to the basement where Dave showed me how the chocolate was  tempered and later, poured into molds.   At a counter nearby, a young employee was busy wrapping finished bars in gold foil and then, affixing an outer layer of paper labels.   It was a thrill to peek into the storage room which smelled more heavenly than the threshold above.   Imagine being accidentally locked in this room?   A sweet debacle!!   Stacks of large chocolate bars lined the shelves and Dan let me select a few discounted seconds to buy.

affrogatoBack upstairs, I selected a few more items to buy and accepted Dan’s invitation to sample their signature dessert — the Affrogato.   He told me that the parents of a friend from Italy created this dessert for their business years ago and it was very popular.   Their daughter now makes the gelato featured in the shop.   I selected hazelnut gelato which Dan topped with fresh brewed espresso, warm melted dark chocolate and fresh whipped cream.   Heavenly doesn’t even begin to touch how uniquely delicious the affrogato was.   What could be better than a mix a cold, warm, chocolate, and cool whipped cream?!   A dessert for a celebration, made to impress a date or revive difficult day?

During my visit, I visited Tabal Chocolate twice and told everyone I encountered to put it on their list.   From my mother’s hospital bed, she asked if I could bring her some cards for her to share with her friends.   Once she’s better, I am sure she will be visiting as I will be when I return to Wisconsin.   Next time, I’ll be sure to sign up for a class in advance so I don’t miss out.   Great job Dan — Tabal Chocolate is the best!

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Savoring my salted dark chocolate Bolivian bar one square at a time.

http://tabalchocolate.com/

 

 

 

 

Making Crepes with Guimillau Morel from Lyons, France

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Making Crepes with Guimillau Morel from Lyons, France
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Guillimau Morel teaching us how to make crepes. July 2017

One of the highlights of hosting exchange students is that they are often eager to teach us how to make a native dish.  This week our latest guest, Guimillau Morel, from Lyons, France showed us how to make crepes.   Guy (his American nickname) shared that he makes crepes almost every week at home and they are very easy.   And I agree!

My son Tristan along with his cousins Elizabeth and  Max joined in for the cooking lesson.

Ingredients:

  • milk
  • flour
  • eggs
  • butter for skillet
  • powder sugar to sprinkle on top
  • fillings:  Nutella, berries, bananas, chicken, etc.

Without a recipe to follow, Guy made the batter by feel.  He cracked two eggs in a large bowl and whisked in several cups of milk.   He alternately added flour and milk to make a thin batter — much thinner to the pancake batter we are accustomed to making.  After melting butter in a 10 inch skillet,  he added a soup ladle of batter and rolled it side to side to cover the entire bottom of the pan with batter.   The crepe cooked for several minutes over medium high heat until the edges became dry and slightly brown.  Then, he tucked a spatula under the edges of the crepe all around and once the entire crepe was loose, he flipped it.   The bottom of the cooked since had some brown spots and cooked another minute or so until removed from the pan.

The finished crepes can be stacked on a plate and kept warm in the oven or stored for a few days in the refrigerator.   With eager tasters, the kids started filling the crepes with Nutella and strawberries as soon as they came off the stove.   Guy told us that in France, there is a tradition that boys fold their crepes and girls roll them.   Who knew?

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In France, boys fold their crepes and girls roll them.

After three crepes each, we were all happily stuffed. Guy shared that crepe parties are popular in France and that his family has a special pan designed to cook multiple crepes at the same time.  I am now sure I want one of those pans so I can make lots of crepes and host a crepe party too!

How Many Vegetables Do You Need to Plant to Feed Your Family?

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0fc367b7cf7b927cc4d111279738629e-600x0-c-defaultHomegrown Pantry:  A Gardener’s Guide to Selecting the Best Varieties & Planting the Perfect Amounts for What You Want to Eat Year-Round, Barbara Pleasant, (Storey Publishing), 2017.

Although I’ve gardened for years, I’ve never really sat down to figure out how much of each vegetable I need to grow to feed my family during the harvest season and how much I need to preserve for the winter.  My inexact method has always been to fill up the space in my garden with things I like, with plants that I buy and grow from seed and hope it all works out.    Sometimes, I have way too much and other times, not enough.

While on a family vacation last week and away from the constant work of my gardens during this busy time of year, I had the chance to visit to the local library and found some great books to read.  About gardening, of course!  The Homegrown Pantry peaked my interest because it spells out how many plants you need to grow of each variety to feed each individual in your household.   After looking quantities of plants on the list, I understand why many farm kids grew up with such huge gardens — half acre or larger!  While I will never have a garden as big at the days of yore, these guidelines are so helpful that I wanted to share them with everyone.   And put them in a place I can always reference.

How much to grow

Plant Per Person For preservation and storage Preparation
Asparagus 15 plants freeze, pickle, dry
Beans – Bush 15 row feet per person freeze, pickle, pressure can, dry
Beans – Pole 5 row feet per person
Beets 5 row feet per person 20 row feet per person Place in cold storage, pickle, ferment, can
Broccoli 3 plants per person for fresh eating 9 plants for freezing freeze
Brussel Sprouts 4 plants per person More for storage freeze
Cabbage 3-4 small heads per person for spring 5-10 per person for fall crop ferment, freeze, pickle, dry
Carrots 20 row feet per person refrigerate, place in cold storage, freeze, pickle
Corn 50 row feet per person freeze, can, dry
Cucumbers 8 plants pickle
Garlic 30-50 plants per person cool storage, dry, pickle
Kale and Collards 3 plants per person in Spring 9 plants per person in fall freeze, dry
Kohlradi 5 row feet per person in spring 5 row feet per person in fall freeze, dry, ferment
Onions 40 bulbs per person cool storage, dry, freeze
Parsnips 10 row feet per person cold storage, freeze
Peas – snap 15 row feet per person freeze, pickle
Peas – snow peas 10 row feet per person freeze, ferment
Peas – shell peas 20 row feet per person freeze, ferment
Peppers 5 sweet pepper, 2 hot per person freeze, dry, can, ferment
Potatoes 20 row feet per person cool storage, dry, can
Pumpkin 4-6 plants per person freeze or dry
Radishes up to 15 row feet refrigerate, ferment, pickle
Rhubarb 3 plants freeze, can, dry
Rutabaga 10 plants cold storage, freeze, ferment
Spinach 5 row feet per person in spring 10 row feet per person in fall freeze or ferment
Summer Squash 4 plants per person dry, freeze, can
Sweet Potato 12-14 plants per person cool storage, freeze, dry
Swiss Chard 4 plants per person in spring 4 plants per person in fall freeze
Tomatoes 6 plants per person freeze, can, dry
Turnips 12 medium turnips cold storage, freeze, pickle, ferment
Winter Squash 4-6 plants per household cool storage or freeze
Blueberries 5-6 plants freeze, can, dry, ferment
Grapes 3 plants per household dry, can, freeze, ferment into wine
Raspberries 6 plants to start freeze, can, ferment into wine
Strawberries 25 plants freeze, can, dry, ferment
Apples 3-4 dwarf, 2-3 standard dry, freeze, juice, can, ferment
Cherries 1 standard tree, 2 dwarf trees freeze, dry, can
Pears 1-2 trees dry, can, freeze
Plums, peaches, nectarines 2 trees freeze, can, dry, ferment

 

Vegetable/Fruit Per Person For preservation and storage Preparation
Asparagus 15 plants freeze, pickle, dry
Beans – Bush 15 row feet per person freeze, pickle, pressure can, dry
Beans – Pole 5 row feet per person
Beets 5 row feet per person 20 row feet per person Place in cold storage, pickle, ferment, can
Broccoli 3 plants per person for fresh eating 9 plants for freezing freeze
Brussel Sprouts 4 plants per person More for storage freeze
Cabbage 3-4 small heads per person for spring 5-10 per person for fall crop ferment, freeze, pickle, dry
Carrots 20 row feet per person refrigerate, place in cold storage, freeze, pickle
Corn 50 row feet per person freeze, can, dry
Cucumbers 8 plants pickle
Garlic 30-50 plants per person cool storage, dry, pickle
Kale and Collards 3 plants per person in Spring 9 plants per person in fall freeze, dry
Kohlradi 5 row feet per person in spring 5 row feet per person in fall freeze, dry, ferment
Onions 40 bulbs per person cool storage, dry, freeze
Parsnips 10 row feet per person cold storage, freeze
Peas – snap 15 row feet per person freeze, pickle
Peas – snow peas 10 row feet per person freeze, ferment
Peas – shell peas 20 row feet per person freeze, ferment
Peppers 5 sweet pepper, 2 hot per person freeze, dry, can, ferment
Potatoes 20 row feet per person cool storage, dry, can
Pumpkin 4-6 plants per person freeze or dry
Radishes up to 15 row feet refrigerate, ferment, pickle
Rhubarb 3 plants freeze, can, dry
Rutabaga 10 plants cold storage, freeze, ferment
Spinach 5 row feet per person in spring 10 row feet per person in fall freeze or ferment
Summer Squash 4 plants per person dry, freeze, can
Sweet Potato 12-14 plants per person cool storage, freeze, dry
Swiss Chard 4 plants per person in spring 4 plants per person in fall freeze
Tomatoes 6 plants per person freeze, can, dry
Turnips 12 medium turnips cold storage, freeze, pickle, ferment
Winter Squash 4-6 plants per household cool storage or freeze
Blueberries 5-6 plants freeze, can, dry, ferment
Grapes 3 plants per household dry, can, freeze, ferment into wine
Raspberries 6 plants to start freeze, can, ferment into wine
Strawberries 25 plants freeze, can, dry, ferment
Apples 3-4 dwarf, 2-3 standard dry, freeze, juice, can, ferment
Cherries 1 standard tree, 2 dwarf trees freeze, dry, can
Pears 1-2 trees dry, can, freeze
Plums, peaches, nectarines 2 trees freeze, can, dry, ferment

The Ice Saints of May

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IMG_9717I was not surprised when a Spring snowstorm blew through Colorado on May 18 and 19th.  This happens almost every Spring despite weeks of lovely sunny warm weather.   Because of this, I never ever plant any warm season crops until Memorial Day weekend.   On Wednesday night May 17, temperatures dropped below freezing and the next day snow fell heavily in the city and more in the mountains.   In the preceding weeks, the sun had been shining and we’d all been wearing shorts and digging in our gardens.   Many eager gardeners who’d  been seduced into filling their pots with Mother’s Day flowers and seeding their plots with warm season crops, had to scramble to protect everything from the impeding storm.

In the days before weather forecasts on radio and TV, gardeners of northern Europe would look to the feast days of the “ice saints” as a guide to planting their gardens.   I was alerted to this weather folklore by my German friend who is familiar with this historical planting guideline.   I did some research and from “Marlies Creative Universe”,

http://mcuniverse.com/2010/what-are-the-ice-saints/    I found this reference:

The “Ice Saints” Pankratius, Servatius and Bonifatius as well as the “Cold Sophie” are known for a cooling trend in the weather between 12th and 15th of May. For centuries this well-known rule had many gardeners align their plantings after it. Observations of weather patterns over many years have shown, however, that a drop in temperature occurs frequently only around May 20. Are the “Ice Saints” not in tune anymore? The mystery solution is found in the history of our calendar system: Pope Gregory VIII arranged a calendar reform in 1582, whereby the differences of the Julian calendar could be corrected to the sun year to a large extent. The day of the “Cold Sophie” (May 15) was the date in the old calendar and corresponds to today’s May 22. Therefore the effects of the “Ice Saints” is felt in the timespan of May 19-22. Sensitive transplants should only be put in the garden beds after this date.

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Being of Irish descent, I was not aware of this folklore but from personal experience, I know that planting warm season crops like tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, pumpkins, corn, cucumber and many flowers is not safe until late May.   When the storm arrived this year, I knew the feast of the ice saints were here.   No matter what the weatherman says, no planting until after the feasts of the ice saints!

Tom Watson Trail and Maruca Sale — Running and Fun Shopping!

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After so many years of trying to stay in shape while juggling a family and many other demands, I finally figured out what really motivates me to get out the door.   Its not an inviting sunny day, a directive on my workout plan or the threat of a race.   Its most definitely getting together with friends and doing something fun after the workout — coffee, breakfast, beer or in today’s case, shopping at a popular biannual factory sale of fabulous, incredibly discounted handbags.   Dangle something fun in front of my nose and I’ll hit the trail for an hour in anticipation of my reward!!!

https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/tom-watson-park

Today’s carrot was shopping at Maruca’s biannual factory sale following our workout.   Our eager group of runners assembled at a home in Littleton to carpool up to Boulder for an hour run on the Tom Watson Trail.   The views of the Flatirons and Boulder reservoir were spectacular and we enjoyed lovely cool weather.   After a little bagel picnic in the park, we headed over to the Maruca headquarters to take our place in line.   Twice a year, this manufacturer of really cute handbags, totes and zipper cases holds a factory sale.   The rock bottom prices attract a long line of customers.   This was the first time I was able to go and was so excited to see all the goodies!

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Being a resourceful shopper, I dipped into the box of remnants and came home with a bag full of scraps and cording   So far, I’ve sown together some coordinating pieces and drafted some patterns to make my own pocketed zipper bags.   Tune in later for some photos of my creations!

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http://marucadesign.com/