Category Archives: People and Places

Tom Watson Trail and Maruca Sale — Running and Fun Shopping!

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After so many years of trying to stay in shape while juggling a family and many other demands, I finally figured out what really motivates me to get out the door.   Its not an inviting sunny day, a directive on my workout plan or the threat of a race.   Its most definitely getting together with friends and doing something fun after the workout — coffee, breakfast, beer or in today’s case, shopping at a popular biannual factory sale of fabulous, incredibly discounted handbags.   Dangle something fun in front of my nose and I’ll hit the trail for an hour in anticipation of my reward!!!

https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/tom-watson-park

Today’s carrot was shopping at Maruca’s biannual factory sale following our workout.   Our eager group of runners assembled at a home in Littleton to carpool up to Boulder for an hour run on the Tom Watson Trail.   The views of the Flatirons and Boulder reservoir were spectacular and we enjoyed lovely cool weather.   After a little bagel picnic in the park, we headed over to the Maruca headquarters to take our place in line.   Twice a year, this manufacturer of really cute handbags, totes and zipper cases holds a factory sale.   The rock bottom prices attract a long line of customers.   This was the first time I was able to go and was so excited to see all the goodies!

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Being a resourceful shopper, I dipped into the box of remnants and came home with a bag full of scraps and cording   So far, I’ve sown together some coordinating pieces and drafted some patterns to make my own pocketed zipper bags.   Tune in later for some photos of my creations!

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http://marucadesign.com/

 

Seasonal, Succession and Companion Planting – Workshop at Ute Trails Garden, 5/7/17

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Seasonal, Succession and Companion Planting – Workshop at Ute Trails Garden, 5/7/17

13177550_1116499921748060_2580476015789243526_nSince becoming a master gardener in 2013, I frequently give workshops at local community gardens.   Today, I had the opportunity to give a workshop at Ute Trail Garden in Lakewood where several of my friends garden.   I am sharing the outline of my program for those who could not attend or would also like to learn about seasonal, companion and succession gardening.

The following are methods used by successful gardeners to maximize their harvest, minimize pests and promote healthy soil.

Companion Planting

  • Some plants grow well together, others do not
  • Some plants, especially herbs, act as repellents, confusing insects with their strong odors that mask the scent of the intended host plants.
  • Dill and basil planted among tomatoes protect the tomatoes from hornworms, and sage scattered about the cabbage patch reduces injury from cabbage moths.
  • Marigolds are as good as gold when grown with just about any garden plant, repelling beetles, nematodes, and even animal pests.
  • Carrots, dill, parsley, and parsnip attract garden heroes — praying mantises, ladybugs, and spiders — that dine on insect pests.
  • Much of companion planting is common sense: Lettuce, radishes, and other quick-growing plants sown between hills of melons or winter squash will mature and be harvested long before these vines need more leg room.
  • Leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard grown in the shadow of corn
  • Sunflowers appreciate the dapple shade that corn casts and, since their roots occupy different levels in the soil, don’t compete for water and nutrients.

Seasonal Planting

  • Cold season vs. warm season crops
  • Last frost date – keep track – generally mid-to –late May in Colorado
  • Cold season crops can be planted before the last frost and some can overwinter under mulch examples: lettuce, kale, carrots, spinach, radishes, onions, sweet peas
  • Warm season crops are planted after the last frost and some need the soil to be warmer examples include pumpkins, squashes, many flowers, beans, basil, corn, sunflowers, tomatoes, peppers, melons

Succession Planting

  • Benefits of succession plantings: maximize space,  extend  harvest window, maintain a continuous supply
  • Make the most efficient use of space and timing to increase productivity
  • Two or more crops in sequence.After one crop is harvested, plant another in the same space.      Plant lettuce every 3 weeks; two crops of carrots
  • Interval succession planting.  Make repeated plantings of the same crop, planting the same variety at timed intervals.     Succession Planting Interval Charts.
  • Two or more crops concurrently.  Plant several different varieties, typically with different maturity dates    Sometimes referred to as “intercropping” and “companion planting.”
  • Same crop, different maturity dates. Plant several varieties, with different maturity dates — early, mid season, and late — at the same time. As they mature over the season, you harvest them one after the other.

Handout on Companion Planting:

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4 X 4 Plot Planting Plan with Cold and Warm Season Crops:

4 X 4 Garden Plan

Vegetable Companion Planting Chart:

http://www.ufseeds.com/Vegetable-Companion-Planting-Chart.html

Pictures of Ute Garden:

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My friend Laura Stevens is one of the leaders at Ute Trail and gave me a tour of the community garden. Here she is in front of her plot. I love how she used thyme for her paths!

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Can I Show You My Jugs and My Rack?

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Can I Show You My Jugs and My Rack?

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Honestly, it’s not as bad as it sounds.   I am referring to the milk jugs and the new light rack I am using to grow seedlings for my garden.  When I found myself asking my garden pals this weekend if they wanted to see my jugs and my rack, I got a few laughs but I didn’t realize how totally funny it sounded until a male garden pal laughed and said, “Yes, I want to see your jugs and your rack!”   Oh, geez, this is a  slightly dirty spin on my garden projects — which are dirty to begin with!

The exciting news is that my experiment of using milk jugs as little greenhouses has sprouted success.   Thank you to hometown Wisconsin friend Maggie Strunk Leyes for inspiring me.   Here are two jugs with little sprouts inside:

I am also stoked about my new grow lights which arrived via Amazon last week and have been shining on my happy crop of tomatoes, eggplant and peppers.   The green glow of the lights has prompted some to ask if I’m growing marijuana plants.   But, although it is legal to grow 6 pot plants per adult in Colorado, I am not growing weed.

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Pilates and The Balanced Life Sisterhood

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Pilates and The Balanced Life Sisterhood

17952978_865590493209_5858890779627771490_nAnyone who knows my workout routine knows that I love my Pilates.  I’ve tried yoga and even have a daughter who teaches it but prefer Pilates for two reasons:  you can talk to your neighbors during class and it focuses on core strength in plain English (no fancy names).   I started going to Lisa’s class at Ken Caryl Community Center about ten years ago and soon became a regular.   Most of my working out tends to be very active — running, swimming, biking, skiing, boot camp, weight lifting, etc. but surprisingly, I found that Pilates offers a great balance to all the pushing I do in very active sports and actually, helps me feel better and takes away a lot of the aches and pains.   After a few years of regular Pilates, I actually measured three quarters of an inch taller!

There are two types of Pilates:   on the reformer and on the mat.   I do Mat Pilates which is done on the floor using an exercise or yoga mat and employs controlled breathing during body weight resisted movement to build core strength.   A typical class lasts about 45-60 minutes.

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After going back to work last year, I was unable to attend my regular class and could only manage to squeeze in a few evening classes a month.   I was excited to hear about an online option from a gal in my running group.  For a low monthly fee, Robin Long, a Pilates instructor based in Boulder (now Santa Barbara) teaches classes five days a week.    After hearing about her program, I immediately checked it out and signed up for a mere $9/month.    I love the flexibility of Robin’s program as well as her encouraging upbeat personality, shorter workouts designed for busy moms and women and well as the support offered by her online community known at the Balanced Life Sisterhood.

14199258_10100593985355466_8713261057227829023_nhttps://thebalancedlifeonline.com/#

In addition to the daily workouts, Robin offers lots other cool things like:

  • Special live streamed workouts on Periscope
  • A monthly mission like getting organized, being mindful, setting goals, etc.
  • A weekly digest email
  • A new spa retreat in Santa Barbara
  • Facebook posts with personal updates
  • Special free programs like the 21 days challenge in February 2017
  • A blog
  • New healthy recipes each month.  Here’s a family favorite:  https://thebalancedlifeonline.com/slow-cooker-chicken-tacos/

slow-cooker-chicken-tacos.pngSlow Cooker Chicken Tacos

Ingredients:

  • 1 ¼ pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast, preferably organic
  • 15 ounces low-sodium black beans, drained
  • 14 ounces frozen corn, preferably organic, straight from freezer
  • 16 ounces mild store-bought salsa, preferably organic
  • ½ cup water
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 cup fresh cilantro, minced
  • Whole wheat tortillas (optional/we used corn to keep it gluten free)

Directions:

Add all ingredients except the cilantro and tortillas to the slow cooker. Mix well.

Cook on low for approximately 8 hours undisturbed. Prior to serving, shred chicken, add cilantro and mix well.

Here’s another link to one of Robin’s YouTube workouts:

If you’re interested in trying Pilates, I encourage you to check out Robin’s free workouts available on her website or on YouTube.   I think registration for the Balanced Life Sisterhood will open up again in September 2017.   It so awesome to feel stronger with her 10-35 minute home workouts.  Let me know what you think!

 

 

Running on the East West Trail

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Sweeping Views of the Snow-capped Front Range and Pike’s Peak

I am always amazed when I have the opportunity to try a new running trail  and today was such a day.    Shari Zimmerman, a member of my running club, knew about the East West Trail in Highlands Ranch from her son who lives nearby.   And several weeks ago, when she described the beautiful mountain views and the lovely hilly trail, our group was eager to check it out.   And today was the day!

The East West Trail is tucked in the stunning Back Country neighborhood just past Mountain Vista High School on Wild Cat Reserve Parkway.   It is a soft surface trail approximately 19.5 miles long stretching from Red Stone Park to Ridgegate Parkway with future connections to Lone Tree and Parker.   We carpooled the 20-30 minutes from our homes in Littleton and Lakewood and parked at Red Tail Park just off  2674 Pemberly Avenue.   When we arrived, the park full of school children and the sun was shining.   A another warm blue-sky Spring Colorado day!    By 8:05 am, the 10 of us had hit the trail.

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http://www.douglas.co.us/documents/east-west-regional-trail-info-and-map.pdf

We knew from Shari’s description that the trail was an uphill climb for almost a mile.   And she’s wasn’t kidding!   With a pounding heart, I jogged and walked up the steep grade in about 12 minutes and at the top, was greeted with a sweeping view of the snow capped Front Range and clear views of both Pike’s Peak to the south and Mount Evans to the West.   Wow!   Vistas like this just make me love Colorado and appreciate my good fortune to live here.   After catching my breath and reading some of the trail signs, my companions and I continued on the public trail for another 20 minutes and turned around.

Along the way, there were narrow dirt paths shooting off the main trail with signs warning nonresidents to stay off  the private property.   I wondered if my sister Pam’s ls.jpg residence in Highlands Ranch would qualify her (and her guests) to use these trails?   For today, we enjoyed the wide, well maintained public trail.    On the way back, most of us were able to run a bit faster. – a real treat!   After an hour on the trail, we met back at the parking lot and all headed to Pierre Michel French Bakery  for breakfast.   What a delight to enjoy French pastries, omelets, quiches and coffee at this lovely local restaurant!

http://www.pierremichelbakery.com/

After I got home and did a little more research, I was happy to find that there is a East-West Trail Half Marathon and 10k on June 10.   I will  have spend some more time training on that big hill before I register!

https://raceroster.com/events/2017/10512/east-west-trail-half-marathon-and-10k

 

 

Falling Head First Into The Garden — The Usual Early Season Psychosis

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April is a heady time of year for me.   Passionate discussions about all aspects of gardening (in-person, on the phone, via text message), frequent visits to local nurseries, intersecting projects and conversations, early morning inspirations and a parade of dirty shoes, gloves and digging clothes littering my floors are all signs that my brain and energy are focused on one subject – THE GARDEN.   Fortunately, the days are getting longer, I have time to work on a myriad of projects and garden geeks eager to talk and share surround me at every turn.

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  • Contacted John Swain, the horticulturalist for the Denver Golf Courses and designer/planter/co-manager of the donation garden at Harvard Gulch Golf Course and passionate home gardener.   A winter has come between our last fact filled gardener conversation so we had a lot to talk about.   As always, he is a fountain of enthusiasm and information and turned me on to two important sources as well as the benefit of using lacto bacillus serum in the garden (labs for short):
  • The Unconventional Farmer:   http://theunconventionalfarmer.com/
  • Build a Soil:  https://buildasoil.com/blogs/news/8634877-gil-carandang-lactobacillus-serum-recipe
  • Labs are a workhorse of beneficial bacteria (which is edible) and has multiple applications including — speeding decomposition in the compost pile, unclogging drains, treating powdery mildew on squash plants, eliminating odor in animal bedding and most importantly,  “Improves growth of plants when applied as foliar spray and soil drench. Improves their efficiency in uptaking nutrients so naturally, growth is enhanced. With the use of these microorganisms, the nutrients you spray or drench to feed your plants become more bio-available and easily absorbable by the plants. Technically, you can say that plants do not use organic nutrients directly. Microorganisms convert organic nutrients to their inorganic constituents which the plants utilize. Utilizing microbes, you will notice better plant growth and health.”   -The Unconvential Farmer.
  • Labs recipe:  I mixed myself up a batch and its still incubating.   Its easy to make and the recipe can be viewed on the link about from the Build a Soil website.   Basically, you wash rice and take the water and fill a Ball jar about 75% full and cover with a paper towel — make sure air can get in.   Store it on top of the refrigerator and after a few days, the liquid will separate.   Siphon off the center layer adding 1 part serum to 10 parts milk and put in another container, cover tightly and let sit for another few days.   Once curds appear, you can strain the liquid with a cheesecloth (the curds can be fried up and eaten).    You add 1 part serum to 20 parts water to spray in the garden.   Store in the frig or add molasses to store at room temperature.  Stable for about a year.

Garden Hacks

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  • Strawberries and asparagus grow happily together; plan to add strawberries to my new planted asparagus patch
  • Used my mole cages to sift compost into my cold frames
  • Sprinkle carrot and beet seeds together every few weeks to have a continuous crop
  • Marijuana growers have to dispose of growing mix are harvesting the plants; the vermiculate and soil less mix is great mixed into raised beds and helps lighten the soil
  • Dryer lint can be put in the compost pile
  • I used paint stirrers for marking seeds and plants.   Pick them up for free every time I stop at Home Depot or Lowe’s.

Progress at Rosedale Garden – my 19th year in this community garden!IMG_9438

  • Planted purple and green asparagus in two 8 inch deep trenches this week; once sprouted will cover with 3 inches of dirt
  • Peas planted on March 15 finally sprouted, planted a third row on April 7
  • Prepped more beds and mapped out where everything is going
  • Seeded pumpkin bed with winter wheat; won’t be planting there for two months
  • Garlic planted in frozen soil in late December is up and growing; looks like its going to make it!
  • Susan has been making videos of me at the garden and I am learning how to edit them!

Opening up the St. Philip Donation Garden

  • Scheduled a work day for this Sunday to get started prepping the beds at St. Philip.
  • One volunteer came and we cleaned up two beds, added fresh compost and planted peas, onions and a variety of cold crops.   Watered and talked about plans.
  • Three plots are spoken for with another two gals potentially interested in volunteering in the donation beds.
  • This is our third year and I’m sorry that I’ve lost my partner of the first two years, Lerae Schnickel to another church ministry.   She was great to work with and its hard to move forward without her support.

Helping at a Jovial Gardens Neighborhood ProjectIMG_9480

  • Jovial Gardens is a really cool Denver-based organization that helps build gardens in neighborhoods.   One of their goals is to decrease food scarcity in the urban environment and  grow food for local food banks.  The group originally started in Edgewater, a suburb on Denver, and organized gardens in more than 40 yards in the neighborhood.   https://jovialconcepts.org/about-us/
  • My friend and master gardener, Teri Connelly is working with Jovial to install gardens in the yards of a number of her neighbors in Arvada.   Today, I had the chance to visit on a work day and saw work in progress in at least 6 yards.   The enthusiasm and excitement of the neighbors and volunteers was awesome.   Teri shared that in one front yard garden they harvested almost a 1000 pounds of organic produce last year.   I would love to start such a program in my neighborhood (Trailmark)  in Littleton.

Seedling Update on the Home Front

  • My experiment of seeding tomatoes and peppers for the first time has had mixed results.   All but one of the 12 varieties of tomatoes I planted has sprouted.   It took less than a week.   I learned that they need a heat mat and lights!IMG_9484.JPG
  • 8 of 11 peppers sprouted this week.   More time needed?
  • The tomatoes are very leggy but John Swain told me that they need grow lights and that its not too late for them to stabilize.
  • I only have one grow light so I’ve set it up for 14 hours alternatively above the trays of peppers, then the tomatoes.   Ordered a 4 foot rack with light from Amazon yesterday so hope it arrives this week.
  • Nothing has sprouted in the milk jugs I planted last week.  Time will tell

 

 

 

 

 

Climbing Before Coffee: Morning Workout at Philip S. Miller Park

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Climbing Before Coffee:  Morning Workout at Philip S. Miller Park

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After climbing the infamous 2000 steps of The Incline in Manitou Springs several years ago, I was excited when a new shorter set of stairs opened in Castle Rock in 2014.   When my Thursday morning running group decided to visit this 200 step staircase, I was thrilled and eager to add this challenge to my list of “firsts — one which is definitely more my cup of tea (or coffee)!

17796027_10210990169223604_4876917730550741267_nAt 7:30 am this morning, our group met at Safeway parking lots near our homes in Littleton to carpool the 25 minutes down to Philip S. Miller Park in Castle Rock.   When we arrived just after 8, the sun was just rising above the backside of the west facing climb and the parking lot was with filling with other equally dedicated climbers.   I was surprised to find the staircase situated in an expansive new park featuring a zip line course, hiking trails, sports fields, an amphitheater, a sports center with a pool, fabulous playgrounds and more.   What a great place to bring a family!

stairsAfter all nine of us assembled, we started the shaded climb.   I was pretty sure that I would not be running up the steps and happy to find that none of the other runners in our group were running either.   Climbing up the first 50 steps, spaced at a more gradual incline,  was relatively easy.   The next section was steeper and little more challenging. Many of us stopped every 10-20 steps to take a breath.
Thankfully, the steps were marked at intervals of 10 so by the time I got to 170 and my heart was pounding, the remaining steps seemed manageable.    The morning sun blazed in our faces as we reached the top and once our eyes adjusted, were greeting with a magnificent view of the small town of Castle Rock to the east, the front range the to west and snowy Pike’s Peak to the south — a fabulous reward for the 10 minute climb.

 

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After a few long minutes catching my breath, I remarked that I must not be in as good a shape as I thought despite running, hiking, skiing and generally leading an active life.  There were nods of agreement among us and chuckles about how hard we all were breathing.   Nothing like a stair climb to test one’s limits!    We waited for everyone to reach the top, took a group photo and headed down the trail on the south side of the hill.   I was pleased to see stunning view of Pike’s Peak on the hike down.   The second time up, I was able to pace myself better and challenged myself to climb 50 and 20 steps at a time.   Enjoyed a few minutes in the Adirondack chair at the top too!chair

By 9 am, we’d all climbed enough laps and resolved to return to run the trails in the park too.    As the last of us reached the bottom, the sound of sirens approached.   Red trucks arrived and a crew of firemen headed up the steps to assist a young man who’d fainted at the top.   Fortunately, the ladies in our group were all OK and ready for coffee.  We loaded up our vehicles and headed north on Highway 85/Santa Fe for a breakfast rendez vous at O’Brian’s in Sedalia.   Was happy to see a few cowboys drinking coffee and a historical photo of a horse hitching post outside this local eatery.    Fun times with the Columbines!

http://www.columbines.org/

http://crgov.com/2051/Philip-S-Miller-Park

 

 

 

 

 

End of Season Report: Brothers’ Garden Competition, 2016

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End of Season Report:   Brothers’ Garden Competition, 2016
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Getting the raised bed ready for planting                                                              .

Its been ten months since Dylan (15) and Tristan (12) started their garden competition at the end of May 2016.   The original goal was a competition to grow the most produce.   As the summer progressed, the goal changed to a more simple one — take care of the garden and see what happens.  The gardens grew all summer (with a little watering help from me) and produced a bounty of produce.   Quite unexpectedly, the one who had not gardened much before shined and worked hard to plant a variety of items and tended carefully to his crops.   The other more experienced gardener who had planted his own plot for six years in my community garden was less than attentive and eventually lost interest in his garden.   Personally, I chalk up his disinterest to adolescence.   He going through some changes and one day, will be back to himself again.

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Tristan planted beet seeds in August.

When I left Colorado in late October for a month in Alaska, the gardens were still producing.   We were still harvesting beets, lettuce, carrots, broccoli, cucumbers, peppers and more.  When I returned in December, the frost had frozen the plants in their tracks.   Each bed remained buried beneath snow and ice for months.   With the recent thaw and sunny spring days of March, I took the time to clean up Dylan’s abandoned 4 X 4 plot and was surprised to find several pounds of carrots growing beneath the soil.  Woohoo!!

 

Here are come pictures of the gardens throughout the summer:

June 4 2016   Just Planted

July 4, 2016   Seeds Sprouting

August 13  The Harvest is Coming In

September 4   More Harvest

As the new garden season begins, I plan to rally my boys to try again and maybe this time, get in some Spring cold crops.   We’re off to Spring Break in MOAB in a few days with many hours to talk and and plan. My fingers are crossed that when we return, they’ll turn some dirt and get started again!

Spring Flowers, Bear Tracks and Running (Fast!) at Hildebrand Ranch Park.

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Spring Flowers, Bear Tracks and Running (Fast!)  at Hildebrand Ranch Park.

This morning I met my running group for a lovely sunny Spring run on the Two Brands Trail in Hildebrand Ranch Park.   This newer trail in Littleton is accessible from my neighborhood of  Trailmark and from a parking lot on Deer Creek Canyon Road.    This time of year,  the grasses are low and the rattlesnakes  have not yet appeared in the relatively cool weather.   A perfect time to hike, run or bike this five mile loop!  Today’s idyllic four mile jog brought to mind another similar expedition in June 2015 which followed a Seattle-like rainy May in Colorado.   That morning, we reveled in the sea of colorful wildflowers and ambled much of the way taking photos and posing  — until we saw the bear tracks on the trail.

Fortunately, we didn’t see the bear tracks until after we turned around.   We’d run about 30 minutes out and had turned around to head back down the hill to our cars. I was the first to see the bear paw prints in the dirt and alerted the others.   Geez — there was bear somewhere nearby and it had trotted along the same path we had run on for about a quarter of a mile!   We knew the bear probably wouldn’t bother us as long as we were noisy.   So we talked and concentrated on finishing our run — fast!   We all laughed how normally we might slowing down on the last leg of a run but not today.    Being one of the slower runners in the bunch, I focused on keeping a brisk pace and not being the last one.  Nothing like a bear to motivate a slow jogger!

Whew!   We all made it to our cars safely with a load of beautiful photos and a lot to talk about at our post-run coffee klatch!

The Creation of Mario’s Garden At Harvard Gulch Golf Course

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The Creation of Mario’s Garden At Harvard Gulch Golf Course

As a leader at Rosedale Community Garden, I often booked the golf clubhouse across the street at the Harvard Gulch Recreation Center for classes, meetings and big events.   Along the way, I got to know the manager of the golf course, Jessie Moisson and we often talked about gardening.   Jessie had been thinking about starting a garden near the clubhouse and last Spring, when I mentioned the possibility again, he was ready.   Jessie quickly scheduled a meeting with me and the chief horticulturalist of the Denver golf courses, John Swain and Mario’s Garden was born.  The garden was named in memory a beloved little squirrel who visited often and was befriended by the golf staff.

IMG_4573John, Jessie and I met in mid-May and discussed how to transform the spot once occupied by a fish pond, the surrounding beds as well as an adjacent rose garden into a vegetable garden to feed the hungry.   I helped map out some plans and with a generous budget and access to a greenhouse, Jessie and John sprang to action shopping for seeds and plants.   Within two weeks, they’d built raised beds with recycled railroad ties, filled them with fresh garden compost and laid out a new irrigation system.   It was so exciting to be a part of such a project; one that literally went from zero to mach five drive in less than a month.

By mid June, tomatoes, beans, peppers, a patch of three sisters (corn, squash, beans), lettuces, carrots, melons, zucchinis, kale and more was planted and sprouting.  The excitement of Jessie and John was palpable every time I came by with a jug of bokashi from Rosedale.   Bokashi is a fertilizer created from “cooking” organic waste anaerobically in large covered buckets.    Mixed with water, it provides a wonderful fertilizer albeit very stinky.   We all reveled in the fecundity of the plot and marveled at the huge harvest.

As the harvest started to come in by early July, Jessie was in search of a benefactor.   After exploring several options, he opted to deliver produce to Cafe 180, a local restaurant that cooks healthy organic meals and customers pay what they can afford.   Later in the season, he donated a huge cache of produce to the Rosedale Garden Harvest Sale.   In my estimation, Mario’s Garden was a beautiful bountiful success.   For the two main caretakers, it was a huge labor intensive project.    As the beginning of a new garden season approaches, I plan to pop in to talk to Jessie and cheer him on in hopes that the garden will continue for a second season.

I took a lot of photos of the garden during the summer and here they are:

In the beginning.   Early May 2016:

Construction underway.   Early June 2016.

Plants and seeds in.   Late June 2016.

The Dogs Days of Summer — August — Garden Growing Like Crazy!

Golf clubs used to stake tomatoes!17424663_10210847950908235_1798747453826736108_n

Bountiful Harvest and Friends in the Garden — September 2016